Feasibility study underway for rail transit in Los Angeles County

California-The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro) is conducting a feasibility study to identify and evaluate a range of high-capacity rail transit alternatives between the San Fernando Valley and the Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to the study, which began in December 2017, Metro is hosting a series of community meetings to solicit input. The study is expected to be completed in the Fall of 2019 and will be the basis for future environmental analysis.

 

The route proposed for the project experiences heavy travel with more than 400,000 people a day traveling through the area. Funding will come from Measure M, a transportation sales tax approved by Los Angeles County voters in 2016. The project will receive $9.8 billion from this sales tax funding. The LA Metro wants to expedite the project through a public-private partnership. The first stage of the project is expected to open in 2033, however, the goal is to have it open for the 2028 Summer Olympics.

Proposals requested for $8M grant program that funds mobility options

Michigan- Michigan has launched an $8 million grant program for ride-sharing companies, automakers, transit agencies and advocacy groups to develop new mobility options for seniors, handicapped residents and military veterans. The state has issued a request for bids that is due by July 6. The first round of winning bidders will have 60 days to launch innovative pilot programs. The funding for the pilot program comes from the supplemental spending bill Gov. Rick Snyder signed in March which includes $175 million in extra roads and transportation funding, including $15 million the state could use on next-generation connected vehicle projects, hydrogen fueling stations and ride-sharing pilot projects.

The state plans to award grants to projects of various sizes based on submissions and proposed service areas. They’ll be used to subsidize a portion of costs to plan, implement and monitor the pilot projects for three to six months. The state expects to fund projects in urban, rural and suburban communities in coordination with current services.

Prince George’s County explores P3 for school projects

Maryland-The Prince George’s County Council has adopted a council resolution, CR-33-2018, establishing a Public-Private Partnership (P3) Alternative Financing School Infrastructure Work Group to explore a P3 concept for school construction and replacement projects in the county. The 2018 Maryland General Assembly also enacted Senate Bill 92 this session, establishing an incentive pilot program to encourage local school systems in three counties, including Prince George’s, to pursue innovative, public school construction projects. The P3 Work Group will identify projects and solicit private-sector support by working with the school system and county executive to hire a consultant to create the structure to launch a P3. It is anticipated that five to seven projects may be initially identified.

 

Under the legislation, the P3 Work Group will provide quarterly status reports summarizing the status of implementation, key initiatives or studies planned and an estimated timetable for delivery of recommendations for program implementation. The first quarterly report will be due on Oct. 1, 2018. The Prince George’s County Council also approved a record $4.09 billion in spending for fiscal year 2019, an increase of $215 million, or 5.5 percent over the current budget. If the budget is approved by county executive Rushern Baker III, the spending plan will take effect on July 1.

New Hanover County seeks P3 for ‘Project Grace’

North Carolina– New Hanover County is exploring the option of entering into a public-private partnership (P3) for redevelopment of a 3-acre county-owned block in downtown Wilmington. The county issued a request for qualifications to find the most qualified project teams. The top teams will be invited to submit a full development proposal by December.

 

The county has envisioned a public library, Cape Fear Museum, usable green space and a parking deck. A space needs analysis was recently conducted to identify the needs of both the museum and library. In the new fiscal year, the county plans to conduct a separate study to determine the future use of the existing museum site on Market Street. Proposals will be reviewed at the beginning of 2019 for “Project Grace” and the public will then be given the opportunity to provide input.