USDA provides $345.5M for electric service in rural communities

Washington D.C.– The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $345.5 million in 20 infrastructure projects to improve rural electric service in 14 states. USDA is making the investments through the Electric Infrastructure Loan Program. This program helps finance generation, transmission and distribution projects; system improvements; and energy conservation projects in communities with 10,000 or fewer residents. The loans include $7.9 million for smart grid technology. This includes computer applications, two-way communications, geospatial information systems and other tools to increase the reliability and efficiency of electric power systems. USDA is announcing investments in rural communities in California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Below are a few examples of the projects USDA is funding:

 

– In Colorado, the San Isabel Electric Association is receiving a $15.8 million loan to build 63 miles of line and improve 143 miles to serve consumers in Huerfano, Las Animas, Pueblo, Custer, Otero and Costilla counties. The loan includes $752,021 for smart grid projects.

 

– Minnesota’s Goodhue County Electric Cooperative Association will use a $7.75 million loan to construct 28 miles of line and improve 72 miles. The loan includes $315,000 for smart grid projects. Goodhue’s service territory is predominantly agricultural. Most non-farm employment is associated with agricultural and food processing activities.

 

– In Georgia, Amicalola Electric Membership Corporation will use a $61.2 million loan to build 302 miles of line and improve 110 miles. The loan includes $64,000 for smart grid projects. Agriculture and tourism are the major industries in Amicalola’s service territory.

New Hanover County is searching for CMAR

North Carolina– New Hanover County wants a construction manager at risk (CMAR) for an estimated $11 million to $12 million replacement of the Division of Juvenile Justice facility at 138 N. 4th St. in downtown Wilmington. The plan is to expand a one-story structure to an estimated three-story, 35,000-square-foot building to house courtrooms. The need is arising as the state has decided to raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction to 18 years old for non-violent offenses.

 

New Hanover County has already chosen an architecture firm to design the building. The deadline to submit a proposal to be considered as the CMAR for this project is Aug. 15. According to the request for qualifications, the proposed schedule for the project is for the schematic design to be completed by Sept. 25 and construction to be done by December 2020.

San Francisco to rehabilitate 13 piers

California– The Port of San Francisco is seeking developers for redevelopment of 13 of the city’s historic piers and the Agriculture building adjacent to the Ferry Building. Proposed concepts are expected to align with the priorities outlined in the city waterfront land use plan, which include: arts and culture, assembly and entertainment, education, food and beverage, maritime (excursion and leisure), museums, recreation and specialty retail. All plans should highlight the historic waterfront’s potential to deliver an outstanding patron experience.

 

Responses to the request for information

are due at the end of October, and a request for proposals is expected in early 2019. Successful public-private partnerships have resulted in the rehabilitation of the Exploratorium at Pier 15 and bulkhead buildings at Piers 1½, 3 and 5. These restored facilities add to attractions at the waterfront, alongside Pier 39 and Fisherman’s Wharf. Over 24 million people a year visit the waterfront.

Scarsdale officials issue RFEI for Freightway developer

New York- The redevelopment of the Freightway site in Scarsdale has taken a step forward as officials have outlined a two-part process to find a developer for an aging five-story parking garage and two surface lots. In February, the Freightway Steering Committee presented a study of the 2.5-acre site. The report considered eight months of public input and research. The request for expression of interest (RFEI) calls for developers’ conceptual plans and a description of how they should integrate a mixed-use facility that includes housing, retail, public space and parking. Submissions will be accepted until Oct. 15.

The ideas outlined in the committee’s report are estimated to cost between $52 million and $173 million. There are four different development suggestions from a feasibility study that was conducted earlier in 2018. The next step calls for creating a brief list of developers and a request for proposals, which will take into consideration ideas gathered from the RFEIs. The firms will then submit a proposal with development plans, which will be reviewed by village officials. It could take 9 to 12 months before a final developer is chosen for the project.