Maryland Comptroller seeks RFP for $100M tax system

Maryland– The Maryland Office of the Comptroller is seeking proposals for a $100-million-dollar job to replace the 25-year-old tax processing system. The office released a request for proposals (RFP) with bids due by June 1. The goal is to have a contract before the state’s Board of Public Works in September. The plan is to replace the office tax processing system as well as its collection system.

 

There was an incident in 2016 where the comptroller’s office discovered that $21 million of local income tax had been misdirected going back to 2010. The comptroller’s office collected the proper amount of revenue, but some taxpayers were not classified in the correct taxing districts causing tax revenue to be distributed to the wrong municipalities. The RFP requires that vendors have contracts in at least six other states to qualify.

DOE releases RFP for $1.8B exascale supercomputers

Washington D.C.– U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry has announced a request for proposals (RFP), potentially worth up to $1.8 billion, for the development of two new exascale supercomputers for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories. The timeframe is between 2021 and 2023 to complete the computers. The new supercomputers funded through this RFP will be follow-on systems to the first U.S. exascale system named Aurora, which is currently under development at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and scheduled to come online in 2021. The RFP also envisions the possibility of upgrades or even a follow-on system to the Aurora supercomputer in 2022-2023.

 

The new systems will provide 50 to 100 times greater performance than the current, fastest U.S. supercomputer. Funding for the RFP is being provided jointly by the DOE Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The Office of Science and NNSA are also partners in the Department’s Exascale Computing Project. The plan is to deploy one of the systems to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn., and the other at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif.

Cities are providing drivers a smart way to park

Parking your vehicle in a congested part of town can be just as stressful as the drive to get there. Of course there is the thrill of driving behind a pedestrian who has bags in hand and is heading towards their vehicle to leave. Disappointment sets in as they unload their bags, but don’t leave or forget where they parked and leave you behind on parking deck Z. There is also the stress of getting to the parking meter before it expires or wishing you hadn’t fed the machine such a large quantity of coins. Parallel parking, getting blocked in a space, loading and unloading zones, private parking only… the ordeals of parking are just as long as the lots that are full. But, technology is changing the way we park.

Testing is taking place for Cyber Valet Services, which allows vehicles equipped with special programming to park without a driver on board in connected car parks. The driver exits the vehicle at the car park entrance and activates the automatic parking system using a smartphone to park itself and returning when the driver is ready to leave. Car parks using this technology are equipped with Wi-Fi, video sensors and artificial intelligence-based solutions.

In Georgia, the city of Atlanta’s ATLPlus app allows drivers to pay by phone and extend parking time without having to return to their vehicle or to a meter. The app will also alert drivers when they have 15 minutes on their parking time. Customers can also notify a rapid response team if they spot a broken meter. This team is expected to fix the meter within 24 hours.

In Maryland, the city of Wheaton is also installing smart meters that allow drivers to use coins, credit cards or they can pay through their cell phone. The old meter poles will remain, but the inner workings of them will be updated with the new technology. Law enforcement have access to the meters and can tell if they are expired or in use. All of the meters are solar powered.

In Texas, the San Antonio Airport is using a parking guidance system which uses license place recognition technology and directional signage to help guide drivers to the nearest available space. The signage displays real-time parking availability throughout the entire facility of over 1,200 spaces. The parking technology also provides surveillance cameras which captures streaming video whenever motion is detected in or around a space.

A program called Trucker Path was launched in 2015 to help truckers locate parking in their vicinity. The free service is constantly updated and verified by a community of truckers to ensure its accuracy. It provides drivers a trip planner with detailed information about truck-friendly points-of-interest along the way including hotels, weigh stations, truck stops, truck washes, restaurants and rest areas.

The smart-meter trend is growing and there are several cities throughout the United States requesting information and proposals to update their parking experience for drivers. In New York, the city of Rochelle is seeking to update and modernize its 750 on-street meters to accommodate smart growth and planning for the city. The selected vendor will be required to sign a service agreement for a term of three years with an option to renew for two additional three-year terms. The request for proposals is due by Aug. 3.

In Florida, the city of Delray Beach is looking to eliminate free street-side parking downtown, including the parking garages, by adding smart parking meters to its 3,000 plus parking spaces. The meters would change cost per hour depending on demand, similar to surge pricing. The plan will require the city to hire additional personnel to enforce the meters and city commissioners want to look at cost estimates and revenue projections before approving the meters. Currently, the parking garages charge a $5 flat fee after 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and other parking spots downtown are free 8-hour or 2-hour parking.

In Louisiana, the city of Lafayette is experimenting with smart meters and would like to phase out the city’s 630 coin-operated meters. The smart meters could accept credit cards, sense if a vehicle is in a parking spot, update parking rates and allow drivers to sign up for a payment system through their cell phone.  City council members plan to vote on July 11 whether to move forward with the meter installation and begin charging drivers through dynamic pricing or demand-responsive pricing. The proposed changes would also allow the city to set aside certain parking spaces for electric vehicles and offer vehicle charging services at those sites.

In South Carolina, the city of Charleston approved a budget for smart parking meters after reviewing a parking study that was completed in the fall. Each meter is expected to cost between $800 and $900. The budget will also be used to establish parking on the first floor of parking garages and new signs.

With increasing adoption of these efficient real-time parking systems the demand is expected to increase at airports, hospitals, shopping malls, commercial parking garages, universities and other event avenues. The strong integration of the real-time parking system, Internet of Things and cloud data is opening new avenues for the users and manufacturers.

If you are looking for a different way to pay for parking, a company called TravelCar will let you park for free, but you have to be willing to let someone else borrow your car. The Paris-based car sharing service turns parked cars into cash for their owners, offers free airport parking and helps travelers earn money by renting out their car to other travelers while they are away.  If you agree to let your car be rented by other travelers while you’re traveling, you get free airport parking. Your car is protected with $1 million in liability insurance and is covered against theft and physical damage. You also get paid for every mile that’s driven. If your car is not rented, you still get free parking.

From a renter’s perspective, you get access to a private car rather than paying the cost of renting from traditional rental car companies. If you’d rather not share your car, you can still park with TravelCar and receive the lowest airport parking rates guaranteed. TravelCar launched its U.S. operations on June 14 with an office in Los Angeles. Founded in 2012 and based in Paris, TravelCar is currently operating in 30 countries in 200 locations. They are slated to open at a San Francisco location in July, followed by eight additional U.S. markets this year.

Amphibious and autonomous? Drones and other vehicles making waves underwater

A drone that vacuums the ocean? One that collects whale mucus? An autonomous submarine? Airborne drones and autonomous vehicles are going under the surface of the ocean for data and defense, and they’ve got the nautical miles to prove it.

The submerged portion of bridges and piers need to be surveyed for signs of erosion, destruction and for visual signs of distress. Commercial divers undergo the task of underwater bridge inspections and for safety reasons, teams of three or more divers navigate below the water to not only inspect the bridge’s edifice but also monitor the other divers’ security. Underwater drones can now protect divers from these situations and make routine inspections and repairs possible. A survey and imaging system can be mounted on a remotely operated vehicle or an autonomous underwater vehicle to inspect the deepest structures and bridges. Underwater drones can supply better methods for acquiring and recording data that improve quality, cost-effectiveness and safety of traditional inspections.

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant recently announced the Governor’s Ocean Task Force in an effort to build better national security by using unmanned maritime technology. The new task force would consist of 25 volunteers who will develop a master plan for the Gulf Coast that will create an environment for attracting the unmanned maritime systems industry to the state. The Task Force, which is modeled after Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson’s Task Force Ocean, will address a growing need within private and public sectors to close a widening competitive gap around ocean science and technology.  The master plan is due 120 days from the announcement of the Task Force, which will exist through Bryant’s term.

The Navy, in its 2018 budget submission to Congress, said it plans to conduct trials with existing underwater drones and continue developing new types of technology before formally adding the craft to the fleet. Underwater drones have become an area of increasing interest to the Navy as the branch plans to grow spending on undersea systems to $3 billion in future years. Large defense companies have made acquisitions of underwater drone makers within the past year in an effort to position themselves for that growth. The Navy has been developing underwater drones that could patrol the world’s seas along a network it calls “the Eisenhower highway,” which eventually could include refueling stations that would allow the unmanned craft to stay at sea for months at a time.

During a briefing at the Surface Navy Association conference in Virginia, officials announced plans to release a request for proposals as early as this month for the Extra-Large Unmanned Underwater Vehicle program. The Navy’s goal is to have large, underwater drones that can be linked together and provide an undersea network of communication.

The drone will have the ability to be released from the shore and have the potential to perform offensive maneuvers while underwater. The drones will be judged on vehicle design and construction. The government will chose up to two competitors for a 12 to 18 month design phase before selecting to a single company, which will build the first five vehicles.

Another underwater vehicle that has piqued the interest of the Navy is the Echo Voyager, a full autonomous underwater vehicle measuring 51 feet long. The vehicle is built to operate at sea for months at a time with a hybrid rechargeable power system. Testing on the 50-ton prototype began June 5 in the Pacific Ocean.

This year’s Rose Festival Fleet Week wrapped up on Monday in Portland, Ore. The event welcomes the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy who bring large vessels to Portland’s waterfront for a celebration. In the past, divers would go underwater to clear the seawall to make sure it’s free of obstructions or anything that could be hazardous to the ships. For the first time ever this year, the Coast Guard instead sent remote operated water drones down to look for weapons or devices.

While some drones are looking for hazardous weapons, others are looking for hazardous waste. The Waste Shark is a small aquatic drone that can vacuum up 1,100 pounds of floating trash. There are four prototypes riding around the Port of Rotterdam Authority in the Netherlands  through the end of the year. The sharks, which are approximately the size of a passenger car, pick up trash in a 14-inch opening that extends below the surface of the water. They’re autonomous, which means they’re able to patrol for trash continuously without oversight.

It’s not necessarily trash, but whales a spewing out body waste that’s  getting collected by a SnotBot. The drone is fitted with a camera and collects aerial video and images from the whales, which scientists use to review the whale’s behavior and body features without disturbing the mammals with loud boats or aircraft. The drone collects the mucus that’s exhaled out of the blowholes on the tops of whales’ heads. In the past, scientists would position a long pole over a whale’s blowhole to collect samples or perform a necropsy on a dead whale. The drones, which have been used along the coasts of Patagonia, Mexico and Alaska, can identify particular whales and assess their health in real time.

Another drone that could make waves someday come from a company in Richmond, Calif. A 30-foot prototype drone will travel by land and sea sometime this year as it carries cargo across the ocean. If the test is successful, the company plans to develop an 80-foot drone that will fly from Los Angeles to Hawaii in 2019. Made of carbon fiber composites and powered by jet engines, the drones would take off from the water, eliminating the need for landing gear and long landing strips. It would land on water several miles from port before taxiing to the dock, where cranes would unload the cargo.

The amphibious drones would cruise at an altitude of about 20,000 feet and would fly slower than piloted cargo planes. If this is successful, the next step is to build a 140-foot drone with a 200,000-pound cargo capacity.